Utilizing Bankruptcy Counsel Expertise


Housed in every federal courthouse there is an area devoted solely to the practice of bankruptcy law. Often the courtrooms and clerk’s office are in an obscure, hard to find back corner of the building. Bankruptcies are so unique they merit their own section in the Federal Rules of Procedure. Cases are generally assigned to judges who only deal with bankruptcies. As a Florida commercial business litigation attorney, you have probably visited the bankruptcy court. Perhaps you attended a 341 creditors’ meeting to represent a client trying to recoup any portion of a loss they were about to experience because of a bankruptcy. Maybe you have actually litigated motions before the bankruptcy judge.

In life, we all have different passions. One of my passions has always been bankruptcy law and debtor/creditor relations. I understand this is not a passion shared by attorneys in general. Even incredibly bright and talented business litigators often attempt to avoid involvement with the bankruptcy system. Yes, the rules we play by are different in the bankruptcy court. Yes, these rules get even more complicated when the bankruptcy involves a business.

As a commercial and business litigator, I have no doubt you have had to explain to clients why they will not be receiving money rightfully due to them because of the bankruptcy laws. I understand these conversations can be difficult and awkward because the outcome seems unfair to a client who is owed money. As the principal of Francis L. Carter, P.A. I am here to act as your bankruptcy consultant. I will work with you and your client to determine what the best possible options are. One of the last things any business person wants to do is spend good money to chase bad. As a consultant, I stand uniquely positioned to help you and your client determine which battles are worth fighting in the bankruptcy system.